Effect of exercise on Prostate Cancer and treatment side-effects

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By Reggie Heywood (Accredited Exercise Physiologist)

 


Did you know that one in six men in Australia will be diagnosed with prostate cancer by the age of 85? It is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and despite a vast array of treatment options available that can manage the disease and its symptoms, thousands of men are living with the effects of prostate cancer. This is essentially a result of better survival rate and better technology (allowing early detection, diagnostics and improved disease specific treatment).reggie4

Fortunately, there has more recently been a focus placed on the survivors who have to deal with the treatment related side effects and residual symptoms of the disease.

If we consider the disease process and management of prostate cancer – we can see how numerous men can be afflicted long after they have finished treatment and are in remission:

Prostate cancer is known as a “hormone receptor positive” cancer – which means it responds to changes in hormones, specifically testosterone and other androgens in this case.

The prostate is assisted in its function by testosterone and other androgens (the hormones that give rise to masculine features in males). Furthermore, testosterone assists in growth of the prostate and growth of the cancerous cells. This often involves enlargement, pain and inflammation of the prostate, which can also cause pelvic floor and sexual dysfunction. However, a large degree of difficulty tends to occur in those who have undergone an intervention such as surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy to the prostate which damages (or removes) the organ along with the cancerous cells.

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Some prostate cancers will have surgery performed on the testes to reduce testosterone production and limit the growth of the cancer. However, the most common treatment for prostate cancer, known as Androgen Deprivation Therapy, is a drug-based therapy which specifically reduces testosterone and other androgen production to prevent the prostate from enlarging, and limits progression of the cancerous cells.

When this happens a host of negative effects ensue, but fortunately, a lot of the side effects of the common prostate cancer treatments can be combated with exercise.


Top 10 symptoms of prostate cancer treatment symptoms that respond to exercise:

  • Reduced muscle strength and mass
  • Increased fat mass
  • Reduced bone density
  • Reduced energy levels and fatigue
  • Reduced testosterone
  • Depression
  • Cognitive decline and memory loss
  • Increased blood lipids (LDL, Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides)
  • Increased blood glucose levels and insulin resistance
  • Incontinence and pelvic floor weakness

Good quality studies show us that exercise is not only effective for treating prostate cancer symptoms – but could be one of the most effective ways to offset/reduce the treatment related sided effects of prostate cancer when appropriately prescribed. There is still room for further studies to be performed, but researchers suggest that resistance training exercise is safe and potentially more effective than cardiovascular based or aerobic exercise in offsetting prostate cancer specific symptoms.

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What’s even more exciting is that there is now a lot of research showing how markers of disease progression, cancer cell growth/re-growth and survival can also be improved significantly with the right type and right amount of exercise.

All of the research surrounding exercise in prostate cancer patients is telling us that exercise has a direct effect on cancer progression and tolerance of cancer treatment which ultimately allows patients to improve their quality and length of life.


Have a look at this video from ABC Catalyst 2016: Exercise and Cancer


Ensure that you consult with a health care professional such as an exercise physiologist like myself, who understands the common toxicities associated with cancer treatments, including in- creased risk for fractures and cardiovascular events with hormonal therapies, neuropathies related to certain types of chemotherapy, musculoskeletal morbidities secondary to treatment, and treatment-related cardiotoxicity. Survivors with metastatic disease to the bone will require modification of their exercise program (e.g., reduced impact, intensity, volume) given the increased risk of bone fragility and fractures.


So if you would like more information on this topic, or to book in a consultation, ring Everton Park Physio on 3354 1819 to book an appointment with me.

Reggie Heywood

Accredited Exercise Physiologist


Reggie new - square

Reggie has a keen interest in developing targeted lifestyle interventions for chronic and complex conditions . He thoroughly believes that exercise is medicine and that educating and empowering people to self-manage their existing injuries and prevent future health concerns is the key to leading a healthy & fulfilling life.


map
We are located upstairs at the
Everton Park Woolworths complex
Shop C3 – Everton Park Retail Centre
768 Stafford Rd, Everton Park, QLD 4053
07 3354 1819

 

 

 

Cervicogenic Headaches

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By Ethan Hanley (Physiotherapist)

 


Do you suffer from Headaches??

As it’s National Headache & Migraine Week, I’m going to walk you through one type of headache that we can help with as physiotherapists.

20170910_030348000_iOSOur physiotherapists can help relieve the headaches caused by the joints and or soft tissues structures of the neck. These are classified as Cervicogenic Headaches and are often persistent headaches commonly arising from the upper levels of the neck (cervical spine) affecting the nerves and their pathways to the face and neck. These nerves interact and can relay pain messages between the head and neck, referring pain from either area to both regions allowing for headaches to accompany or replace neck pain.

These headaches are not exclusively caused by an acute injury to the neck, but can build up over long periods of stress, poor head and neck posture or poor biomechanical technique in the gym, at home, at work or on the sporting field.

How can we help?

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Research has shown that physiotherapy treatment including manual mobilizations and soft tissue techniques can relieve pain and tension symptoms.

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Addressing poor postures by correcting head and neck positioning and strengthening the deep support muscles in the neck is important before progressing to exercise-based programs to build postural strength and endurance. Introducing strategies to include at work, home or the gym help to reduce the increased load to the neck and are also important and effective at reducing cervicogenic headaches.

Other types of therapy including pharmacological for pain relief and psychological treatment addressing the cause of stress, anxiety or depression from persistent headaches are also effective and should be considered during your rehabilitation.


Biondi, D. M. (2005). Cervicogenic headache: a review of diagnostic and treatment strategies. The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, 105(4_suppl), 16S-22S.
Jull, G., Trott, P., Potter, H., Zito, G., Niere, K., Shirley, D., … & Richardson, C. (2002). A randomized controlled trial of exercise and manipulative therapy for cervicogenic headache. Spine, 27(17), 1835-1843.
Racicki, S., Gerwin, S., DiClaudio, S., Reinmann, S., & Donaldson, M. (2013). Conservative physical therapy management for the treatment of cervicogenic headache: a systematic review. Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy, 21(2), 113-124.

If this sounds familiar or if you have persistent neck pain or headaches, call our clinic on 3354 1819 to make an appointment with one of our physios.

 

Ethan Hanley

Physiotherapist


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Ethan believes in manual therapy and tailored exercise prescriptions for reducing your symptoms and restoring function. He provides education and advice for managing your condition or injury throughout your rehabilitation.


map
 We are located upstairs at the
Everton Park Woolworths complex
Shop C3 – Everton Park Retail Centre
768 Stafford Rd, Everton Park, QLD 4053
07 3354 1819

 

 

 

Exercise Induced Asthma/Bronchoconstriction

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By Reggie Heywood (Accredited Exercise Physiologist)

 


Exercise induced asthma is currently referred to as exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) as the development of EIB is different to that of asthma, despite presenting with similar symptoms. Up to 90% of people with asthma, 50% of competitive athletes and up to 26% of all school children will have an episode of EIB.

What exactly is EIB?

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EIB involves the acute narrowing and inflammation of the upper airways in response to vigorous or high intensity exercise. This occurs due to the dryness of the air, being inhaled at a faster rate, which exceeds the humidifying capacity of the airways and thus results in swelling of the airways. Asthma is a chronic lung condition that reacts acutely to triggers with swelling, inflammation and sensitivity of the airways that leads to increased mucous production and difficulty.

 What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of EIB include coughing, wheezing, tightness or discomfort in the chest, throat pain, gastrointestinal distress or stomach ache, breathlessness and/or excessive mucus production in response to increases in activity. These symptoms often appear or get worse 5-10 minutes after exercise and aren’t always present during a bout of exercise.

 Risk Factors for EIB Aggravation:

  • Poor exercise tolerance – increased aerobic fitness improves the threshold for EIB flare ups.
  • Inadequate warm-up and cool-down – doing this well allows for gradual changes in body temperature in line with changes in air uptake through the airways. 50% of people can also take advantage of a ‘refractory period’ following initial onset of an EIB episode in which symptoms do not return or progress for 2-3 hours after recovering from the initial onset EIB by use of a reliever medication.
  • Environment – cold, dry weather as well as areas with high levels of allergens, pollution, irritant gases/chemicals or airborne particles can trigger EIB. Athletes who participate in endurance and winter sports as well as swimming are at higher risk for EIB. cropped-running-analysis-sports-screening.jpg

 Medications for EIB:

There are numerous different types of medications for EIB, however can generally be classified among the following 3 groups:

Short Acting Reliever: These are the fastest acting (lasting 2-4 hours) and most effective for recovery and protection against an EIB episode but these should not be used daily as they can worsen EIB symptom severity in the long term when used too frequently.

Long Acting Reliever: These have a slower onset and longer lasting effect (approximately 12 hours) Repeated doses of these medication in short time frames (anywhere up to 72 hours) may have reduced effectiveness and may be reduced to as little as 6 hours.

Preventative: These medications are often prescribed in short term (<4weeks) but usually will require up to 12 weeks to take full effectiveness in EIB symptom management. People may have different response to different preventative medications however they are designed to reduce symptoms frequency and severity while limiting reliance on short/long acting reliever medications.

You should consult your doctor, chronic disease nurse or pharmacist to determine which medications are best suited to you and exactly how to use them.

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Where an Exercise Physiologist comes in:

In order to manage the sporting, physical activity and exercise components of living with asthma, you may be referred to an Accredited Exercise Physiologist to determine an appropriate management plan or targeted exercise prescription to improve your pulmonary function and allow you to perform your best at the physical activities you enjoy.


*Note for Athletes: 

Elite, professional and semi-professional athletes are often required by sporting regulatory organisations to provide evidence of EIB, such as Bronchial Challenge Test or spirometry results, before they are permitted to use EIB medicines during competition. Athletes must always check with The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) and The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) before taking any medication or supplement, even if prescribed by a doctor to ensure they are in compliance with regulations.  


The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA)
13 000 ASADA (1300 027 232) www.asada.gov.au/

The World Anti-Doping Agency website
www.wada-ama.org

So if you would like some guidance with managing your asthma condition to help you stay active, healthy and fit, ring Everton Park Physio on 3354 1819 to book an appointment with me.

Reggie Heywood

Accredited Exercise Physiologist


Reggie new - square

Reggie has a keen interest in developing targeted lifestyle interventions for chronic and complex conditions . He thoroughly believes that exercise is medicine and that educating and empowering people to self-manage their existing injuries and prevent future health concerns is the key to leading a healthy & fulfilling life.


map
 We are located upstairs at the
Everton Park Woolworths complex
Shop C3 – Everton Park Retail Centre
768 Stafford Rd, Everton Park, QLD 4053
07 3354 1819

 

 

 

Exercise for Asthmatics

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By Reggie Heywood (Accredited Exercise Physiologist)

 


 Did you know over 2.5 million Australians have asthma?

That’s about 1 in 10 adults and about 1 in 9 or 10 children. With those sorts of figures, and coming into Asthma Awareness Week, I thought I’d share some information about this condition, how it can be affected by regular exercise, and how people can still enjoy an active lifestyle with the correct guidance and management.

The Details:

Adults of any age can develop asthma, and is not only developed during childhood as many would believe. On the other hand, some people have asthma during childhood, but end up with very few or no symptoms as adults.

Asthma is a chronic lung disease, which can be controlled but not cured.

The Diagnosis:

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Clinically asthma diagnosis requires both of the following criteria:

  • excessive variation in lung function (‘variable air flow limitation’, i.e. variation in expiratory air flow that is greater than that seen in healthy people)
  • respirator symptoms (e.g., wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, chest tightness) that varies over time and may not always be evident.

IMG_1602.JPGDiagnosis usually involves a spirometry test that will assess lung function, and the diagnosis will be confirmed with an immediate improvement in test results following the administration of a short-acting reliever (Salbutamol/Ventolin or other Bronchodilator).

 

Tips for exercising with asthma:

If you have asthma symptoms when you are undertaking exercise or any type of physical activity – the following tips may help you continue with an active lifestyle:

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  •  Improving your total fitness. Greater aerobic capacity will increase your tolerance to exercise and enhance your lung’s ability to cope with strenuous activities.
  • Exercise in a place that is warm and humid – avoid cold, dry air if possible.
  • Avoid exercising where there are high levels of pollens, dusts, fumes or pollution.
  • Try to breathe through your nose more than your mouth during exercise (easier said than done), especially when exercising outdoors. The role of the nose/nostrils is to provide turbulence and humidify the inhaled air, which makes the air warm and moist when it reaches your lungs. Cold dry air inhaled through the mouth is, conversely, likely to exacerbate symptoms.

When to seek help:

If you feel as though you are limited from participating in sport, exercise or general physical activities due to your Asthma symptoms, you may need to get in touch with your GP to discuss a treatment plan that works with your lifestyle.

This may involve small changes to your medication such as an extra puff of your inhaler before a sports game, or it may involve a referral to an Exercise Physiologist to determine an appropriate physical activity management plan or targeted exercise prescription to improve your pulmonary function.

How an Exercise Physiologist (like me!) can help:

Seeing an EP could assist you to:Swap Stretching

  • Improve your muscle strength and fitness
  • Improve your breathing
  • Clear mucus (or sputum) from your chest
  • Reduce your breathlessness during daily activities
  • Make your heart stronger and healthier
  • Increase the number of activities that you are able to do each day or each week
  • Improve your balance
  • Improve your mood and make you feel more in control
  • Make you more physically independent
  • Assist in your weight management

As the specialists in exercise prescription, an Exercise Physiologist can offer improvements in many of your symptoms and limitations through the implementation of a physical activity management plan and/or individualised exercise prescription that will take into account your goals and clinical disease status.


Check out this informational video from Asthma Australia explaining how Asthma affects the body: 


The National Asthma council of Australia has advocated that people should not let Asthma limit physically active lifestyles. This is of incredible importance given the increased risk for numerous lifestyle-related cardiovascular and metabolic diseases associated with being inactive.

Furthermore, it has been suggested that the nature of asthma, being inflammatory with altered immune function, can inherently increase risk for quite a few chronic and non-infectious disease such as inflammatory bowel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, and coronary heart disease – all conditions that can be managed with appropriately prescribed exercise (Juhn et al., 2012).


Juhn, Y. J. (2012). Influence of Asthma Epidemiology on the Risk for Other Diseases. Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Research, 4(3), 122–131. http://doi.org/10.4168/aair.2012.4.3.122

So if you would like some guidance with managing your asthma condition to help you stay active, healthy and fit, ring Everton Park Physio on 3354 1819 to book an appointment with me.

Reggie Heywood

Accredited Exercise Physiologist


Reggie new - square

Reggie has a keen interest in developing targeted lifestyle interventions for chronic and complex conditions . He thoroughly believes that exercise is medicine and that educating and empowering people to self-manage their existing injuries and prevent future health concerns is the key to leading a healthy & fulfilling life.


map
 We are located upstairs at the
Everton Park Woolworths complex
Shop C3 – Everton Park Retail Centre
768 Stafford Rd, Everton Park, QLD 4053
07 3354 1819

 

 

 

Common Rugby League Injuries

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By Jackson Hooper (Physiotherapist)

 


In my experience in rugby league, first as a player, and now as a physiotherapist, I know how important physiotherapy is in diagnosing and managing injuries – from a recreational level to a professional level. Injuries that are left untreated are at increased risk of reoccurring or causing ongoing problems, meaning more time on the sidelines. Here are some of the most common injuries I see in rugby league players.

  1. Ankle sprainsIMG_3828

Ankle sprains are common in football, when a player “rolls their ankle”, either inwards or outwards. There is almost always a tear through one of the many ligaments of the ankle. This sort of injury can be complicated if the player is involved in a tackle and there is external weight coming down on the ankle.

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It is important to diagnose an ankle sprain to rule out an ankle fracture using the Ottawa ankle x-ray rules, while also bearing in mind the increasing prevalence of “high” ankle sprains, also known as syndesmosis injuries, which are more serious. Without proper treatment of an ankle sprain, your ankle can become weakened, which can lead to ongoing problems such as chronic instability or pain.

 

  1. The AC jointimage1

The acromioclavicular joint, better known as the AC joint of the shoulder is commonly injured in contact between players or with the ground, particularly with a direct force to the tip of shoulder.
This injury is important to diagnose as there are 6 classifications of injury, each with a different amount of separation of the joint. The more severe the injury, the longer time it will take to return to sport, and the more important physiotherapy becomes, to ensure full recovery.

  1. Knees

IMG_3857Knee injuries are extremely common in all contact sports, and it is pivotal to gain an accurate diagnosis for correct treatment. Some injuries like an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture or a bucket handle meniscus tear may require a review with an orthopaedic specialist as surgery may provide the best management.

IMG_3859Other structures which may be affected in the knee include the kneecap (patella), the medial and lateral collateral ligaments (MCL/LCL) and less commonly the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Physiotherapy is important for all of these injuries as it will help you to recover fully and return to play with less chance of re-injury.

 

If you have an injury, rugby league related or not, and you would like to come in for assessment and treatment, I am available Monday-Friday from 11:30am to 7:00pm and every second Saturday.


IMG_2632 - CopyJackson has a keen interest in diagnosing and treating musculoskeletal and sporting injuries, and getting you back to training/playing as soon as possible. He has experience working with local sporting teams in rugby league, union and football including the Brisbane Roar Football Club and Normanby Rugby League Club in the Brisbane A grade competition.  


map
 We are located upstairs at the new
Everton Park Woolworths complex
Shop C3 – Everton Park Retail Centre
768 Stafford Rd, Everton Park, QLD 4053
07 3354 1819